Keep Dimple Dell Wild!

It has many names:

The Gully, Dimple Dell, The Dell, Dimple Dell Open Space, Dry Creek, and Dimple Dell Nature Park. She is under attack and could change forever. Families make memories, students come to study nature, runners and mountain bikers come to exercise, horseback riders and ordinary people all flee the city for her soft earthy trails.

NO to Asphalt!

(Read Letters of Support)

Adding asphalt trails and clear zones to current trails could mean miles of 30-50- ft- wide paths of wildlife and native plant displacement and destruction. This will exacerbate the erosion potential and negatively impact the park environment. Let’s not forget our four-legged friends who will burn their feet on the hot asphalt when surface temperatures reach a possible 140 degrees in the hot sun. STOP THE INSANITY…NO ASPHALT…NO GRADING…NO MORE ATTACKS, PLEASE. Let’s be good stewards of this gem and protectors of the land.

COME JOIN US!

The Threat

About Dimple Dell

The Dimple Dell Regional Park is a 646-acre Salt Lake County nature preserve and one of the last remaining undeveloped public parks in in the Salt Lake Valley. It’s Open Space designation in SLCO Park System Master Plan means Dimple Dell is intended to remain pristine, natural, and unaltered by development. It is the largest, last-remaining public preserve along the densely-populated Wasatch Front, and is treasured for its wildlife, native plants, majestic mountain views, and a sense of serenity not found in other parks.

As set out in the park’s management plan, the primary park uses are:

  1. Nature preserve, with preservation and enhancements to the natural environment;
  2. Nature education, including a Nature Education Center, with the main purpose being a natural history and cultural history interpretation;
  3. Recreation trails including hiking, jogging, bicycling, cross-country skiing and equestrian activities.

Wild Rose Hips

Historical & Archaeological Value of Dimple Dell

Archaeologist Lance McNees of EcoLogic Environmental Consultants talks to KRCL's Lara Jones about the artifacts found while excavating a pithouse in Dimple Dell Park on May 3, 2015.

questar report

The Dimple Dell Site: Late Archaic-Formative Transition Period Occupations in the Salt Lake Valley, by EcoLogic Environmental Consultants, LLC. 2016 July.

(Link to Dimple Dell Site Report for Questar)
byu report

A Cultural Resource Inventory of Dimple Dell Regional Park, Salt Lake County, Utah, by James D. Wilde and Don D. Southworth. 1989 December 14.

(Link to Dimple Dell Cultural Resource Paper by BYU)

About Us

We are dog walkers, trail runners, hikers, equestrians, cross-country skiers, bird/bug/animal watchers, school cross country teams, scouts earning merit badges, nature and conservation clubs and societies, botanists and plant lovers, science class taking nature field trips or working on a science project, residents and neighbors who love this easy access to a natural, pristine area right here in the valley.

We are quiet visitors who come to the park in the hopes of spotting a deer, rabbit, fox, badger, skunk, coyote, owl, blue jay, red velvet ant, Jerusalem cricket, and other animals and birds. In the spring, beautiful wildflowers, pioneer-era native bunch grasses, and a wide variety of other native plants and trees dot the park's landscape and uplift our souls. The Park is a place to observe nature, to hear yourself think, to see a corner of the Salt Lake Valley the way it was before it became a major metropolitan area.

We are quiet visitors who come to the park in the hopes of spotting a deer, rabbit, fox, badger, skunk, coyote, owl, blue jay, red velvet ant, Jerusalem cricket, and other animals and birds. In the spring, beautiful wildflowers, pioneer-era native bunch grasses, and a wide variety of other native plants and trees dot the park's landscape and uplift our souls. The Park is a place to observe nature, to hear yourself think, to see a corner of the Salt Lake Valley the way it was before it became a major metropolitan area.

We join together to advocate for the wildlife and native plant inhabitants of the park, the compatible use of the park, to save this last piece of heaven right here in the valley.

Contact us at: dimpledellwild@gmail.com

Jerusalem Cricket